Know Your Flags: 4 US State Flags and Why They Exist

Know Your Flags: 4 US State Flags and Why They Exist

Only a year after the Founders of America marked Independence in the country, the recently framed US received a solitary image that would join the nation in its outset: the American banner. Flag Day falls on June fourteenth every year. Hence, we’ve gathered together the most intriguing facts about each state banner in America. Prepare to discover which state banner has a smidgen of the U.K. in it, which banner isn’t rectangular, and what every one of those hues in Colorado’s famous flag represents!

Know Your Flags: 4 US State Flags and Why They Exist
Know Your Flags: 4 US State Flags and Why They Exist

Cool US State Flag Facts That Will Blow You Away

California State Flag

Before California turned into an official state, it was constrained by Mexico. In any case, as an ever-increasing number of Americans started to settle there around 1846, they chose to oppose the nation with an end goal to turn into a free republic and at last join the association. At the point when they did that, they raised the Bear Banner, an antecedent to California’s present state banner. The disobedience (alongside the Mexican-American War it agreed with) was effective and in 1850, California turned into an authority U.S. state. Around 20 years after the fact, the Bear Banner turned into the official flag in 1911, according to the History Channel.

The Alaskan Flag

In 1927, before Alaska turned into an express into the next 30 years, something happened. The Alaska Department of the American Legion held a banner plan challenge. Furthermore, it was for Alaskan youngsters, grades 7 through 12. The victor of the challenge was Benny Benson, a 13-year-old who was living in a halfway house at the time. As indicated by the Alaska Historical Society, Benson was granted an engraved watch and a $1,000 grant. In 1959, his plan—which comprises of eight gold stars that structure the Bigger Dipper and Polaris—turned into the official state banner.

Arkansas State Flag

The three stars underneath “Arkansas” on this state banner speak to three realities about the state. This is as per Arkansas Secretary of State John Thurston. Further, the principal star speaks to the way that Arkansas has had a place with three countries. These three countries include France, Spain, and the United States. The second speaks to that the state was obtained through the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Moreover, the third speaks to Arkansas as the third state made from the Louisiana Purchase, after Louisiana and Missouri. The blue-and-white precious stone star outskirt brings out the Confederate fight banner. Arkansas is the second of America’s 50 states to remember a gesture to this supremacist section for U.S. history in its flag.

Know Your Flags: 4 US State Flags and Why They Exist
Know Your Flags: 4 US State Flags and Why They Exist

Hawaiin Flag

The Hawaiian banner is the main American state banner to fuse a national image from another nation. Moreover, this is as indicated by Tim Marshall, writer of the book A Flag Worth Dying For. This goes back to 1793. In 1793, a British military chief exhibited the banner to King Kamehameha I of Hawaii as an image of companionship. The association banner flew as Hawaii’s just banner until 1816 when the red, white, and blue stripes were included, as indicated by the BBC.

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